Boys at a school wait for daily food rations handed out by the World Health Organization in cooperation with International Medical Corps. This nutritious and high calorie meal is, in most cases, the the only one  the kids will have each day. Most of Burundi's population is malnourished. 2008

 

According to the World Food Programme, less than 20% of Burundi’s population is food-secure, nearly half are chronically malnourished and as much as 10% rely on international aid for food. In addition to endemic poverty, Burundi is still trying to recover from the violence surrounding the 1994 Rwandan genocide, a conflict that spilled over its borders. Often, people don’t recognize the symptoms of malnutrition—hair turning orange-blonde, distended stomach—and seek help very late in the sickness.

 

A nurse checks the status of one of her patients in a nutrition center run by International Medical Corps in rural Burundi. This center's funding and management was re-routed to Burundi Health Department and soon after, shut down. Most of Burundi's population is malnourished. 2008

 

According to the World Food Programme, less than 20% of Burundi’s population is food-secure, nearly half are chronically malnourished and as much as 10% rely on international aid for food. In addition to endemic poverty, Burundi is still trying to recover from the violence surrounding the 1994 Rwandan genocide, a conflict that spilled over its borders. Often, people don’t recognize the symptoms of malnutrition—hair turning orange-blonde, distended stomach—and seek help very late in the sickness.

 

Parent volunteers serve daily food rations donated by the World Health Organization in cooperation with International Medical Corps at a school in rural Burundi. This nutritious and high calorie meal is, in most cases, the the only one the kids will have each day. Most of Burundi's population is malnourished. 2008

 

According to the World Food Programme, less than 20% of Burundi’s population is food-secure, nearly half are chronically malnourished and as much as 10% rely on international aid for food. In addition to endemic poverty, Burundi is still trying to recover from the violence surrounding the 1994 Rwandan genocide, a conflict that spilled over its borders. Often, people don’t recognize the symptoms of malnutrition—hair turning orange-blonde, distended stomach—and seek help very late in the sickness.

 

A recovering malnourished child sits in his mother's arms. He was brought to a nutrition center run by International Medical Corps in rural Burundi where he was treated for a couple of months. The center, like many others, is in danger of being shut down after funding and management has been recently redirected to the Burundi Health Department. Most of Burundi's population is malnourished. 2008

 

According to the World Food Programme, less than 20% of Burundi’s population is food-secure, nearly half are chronically malnourished and as much as 10% rely on international aid for food. In addition to endemic poverty, Burundi is still trying to recover from the violence surrounding the 1994 Rwandan genocide, a conflict that spilled over its borders. Often, people don’t recognize the symptoms of malnutrition—hair turning orange-blonde, distended stomach—and seek help very late in the sickness.

 

Technicians in a clinic in rural Burundi analyze samples for blood born pathogens that exacerbate the endemic malnutrition in the country. The clinic, like many others, is in danger of being shut down after international funding has been recently redirected to the Burundi Health Department. Most of Burundi's population is malnourished. 2008

 

According to the World Food Programme, less than 20% of Burundi’s population is food-secure, nearly half are chronically malnourished and as much as 10% rely on international aid for food. In addition to endemic poverty, Burundi is still trying to recover from the violence surrounding the 1994 Rwandan genocide, a conflict that spilled over its borders. Often, people don’t recognize the symptoms of malnutrition—hair turning orange-blonde, distended stomach—and seek help very late in the sickness.

 

This child is typical of the patients seen in nutrition centers throughout rural Burundi run by International Medical Corps. At eight years old, she has already suffered severe malnutrition twice and was brought in for treatment again by her father. The center, like many others, is in danger of being shut down after funding has been recently redirected to the Burundi Health Department. Most of Burundi's population is malnourished. 2008

 

According to the World Food Programme, less than 20% of Burundi’s population is food-secure, nearly half are chronically malnourished and as much as 10% rely on international aid for food. In addition to endemic poverty, Burundi is still trying to recover from the violence surrounding the 1994 Rwandan genocide, a conflict that spilled over its borders. Often, people don’t recognize the symptoms of malnutrition—hair turning orange-blonde, distended stomach—and seek help very late in the sickness.