Maoist Bathi, the strongest of the communist parties in Nepal, frequently write propaganda and slogans throughout the countryside, including in the Sindupalchowk district.  This district in western Nepal, some argue is one of the strongholds of the movement. 2001

 

Before it became Nepal’s ruling party in 2008, the Unified Communist Party of Nepal led a grassroots, mostly rural Peoples’ War. While spreading their message in the countryside, the Maoist movement often distributed seed and basic farm tools. Though the movement at first had a huge intellectual following in Kathmandu, as it grew, purging of those who spoke against it, including intellectuals, was often met with extreme violence.

 

This small village in western Nepal is typical of many, and is vulnerable to attacks by the Maoist Bathi, the strongest of the communist parties in Nepal. 2001

 

Before it became Nepal’s ruling party in 2008, the Unified Communist Party of Nepal led a grassroots, mostly rural Peoples’ War. While spreading their message in the countryside, the Maoist movement often distributed seed and basic farm tools. Though the movement at first had a huge intellectual following in Kathmandu, as it grew, purging of those who spoke against it, including intellectuals, was often met with extreme violence.

 

A Maoist commander stands with his grenade in the Rolpa district in far western Nepal. Maoists soldiers frequently carry "dirty" grenades— homemade and filled with bits of rusted metal, designed to maim and not necessarily kill. 2003

 

Before it became Nepal’s ruling party in 2008, the Unified Communist Party of Nepal led a grassroots, mostly rural Peoples’ War. While spreading their message in the countryside, the Maoist movement often distributed seed and basic farm tools. Though the movement at first had a huge intellectual following in Kathmandu, as it grew, purging of those who spoke against it, including intellectuals, was often met with extreme violence.

 

Women carry branches and leaves used for animal bedding in the Sindupalchowk district of Nepal. Maoist Bathi, the strongest of the communist parties in Nepal, frequently go to villages throughout the countryside looking for conscripts and converts. This district, in western Nepal, some argue is one of the strongholds of the movement. 2001

 

Before it became Nepal’s ruling party in 2008, the Unified Communist Party of Nepal led a grassroots, mostly rural Peoples’ War. While spreading their message in the countryside, the Maoist movement often distributed seed and basic farm tools. Though the movement at first had a huge intellectual following in Kathmandu, as it grew, purging of those who spoke against it, including intellectuals, was often met with extreme violence.

 

A police outpost in the Rolpa district was attacked by Maoists who first surrounded it then killed everyone they found. 2003

 

Before it became Nepal’s ruling party in 2008, the Unified Communist Party of Nepal led a grassroots, mostly rural Peoples’ War. While spreading their message in the countryside, the Maoist movement often distributed seed and basic farm tools. Though the movement at first had a huge intellectual following in Kathmandu, as it grew, purging of those who spoke against it, including intellectuals, was often met with extreme violence.

 

As part of their tactics to quell dissent, Maoists publicly torture villagers who speak up against their movement. Often, as with this teacher, they brake bones. 2003

 

Before it became Nepal’s ruling party in 2008, the Unified Communist Party of Nepal led a grassroots, mostly rural Peoples’ War. While spreading their message in the countryside, the Maoist movement often distributed seed and basic farm tools. Though the movement at first had a huge intellectual following in Kathmandu, as it grew, purging of those who spoke against it, including intellectuals, was often met with extreme violence.